Media Files
Title:
Wally Rosenthal Oral History
Collection:
Queens Memory Project
Organization:
Queens Public Library
Duration:
01:31:25
Agent:
Interviewer Tess Hartman
Date:
created 2011-03-19
Description:
general

Clip 1: Playing in Flushing

Wally Rosenthal remembers growing up with a lot of other children to play with in his Flushing neighborhood. They played stoopball, boxball, stickball, tag, and touch football. They would also venture onto the Queens College campus where he remembers a wooded area and a farm where John Bowne High School's farm was later developed. 01:27 minutes

Clip 2: Neighborhood diversity

Wally Rosenthal remarks that growing up, his neighbors were largely of European descent. He considers the integration of Christian and Jewish families significant in the neighborhood since at the time, anti-Semitism was more out in the open. In 2011, the neighborhood is a much more international community, which is reflective of Queens as a whole. However, there are still not many African American families. When his parents died 25 years ago, he was living with his family in East Flatbush, Brooklyn. It was a predominantly African American and working-class community. When his brothers wanted him to move into his parents’ house, he and his wife had initial concerns that it was not diverse enough, but ended up moving there. 02:13 minutes

Clip 3: Activism and Queens College

Wally Rosenthal describes how he began his first semester at Queens College in September, 1964 in the wake of Freedom Summer. Three Civil Rights activists including Queens College student Andrew Goodman had been murdered in Mississippi. Students at Queens College did a fast in order to demand that the U.S. government and FBI investigate what happened, which one of Rosenthal's brothers participated in. Later, his brother Eric encouraged him to join the Student Help Project, a student-run organization that tutored kids in South Jamaica, Queens. Rosenthal describes how in 1960, his other brother Peter participated in sit-ins at Woolworth's lunch counter in downtown Flushing in solidarity with the sit-ins at Woolworth's in Greensboro, NC. 03:02 minutes

Clip 4: Brought up in a progressive home

Wally Rosenthal describes his parents as being politically and philosophically progressive. He characterizes himself as a "red diaper baby." His mother was more active politically, identified as a Marxist and a member of the Communist Party in the U.S. Her parents were leftists in Tsarist Russia, and came to the U.S. in 1913. 01:13 minutes

Clip 5: Protest and Violence

Wally Rosenthal recounts a memorable early experience he had with demonstrations. It was a protest against nuclear weapons, held in Duffy Square in Manhattan. When some protesters sat down on Broadway, Wally witnessed police charge them violently. 01:52 minutes


Language:
Primary English
Coverage:
temporal 1913-2011
Date:
created 2011-03-19
Agent:
Interviewer Tess Hartman
Source:
http://digitalarchives.queenslibrary.org/search/browse/*?fq[0]=sm_relation%3AQueens+Memory+Project+Collection+at+Queens+College+Libraries%27+Department+of+Special+Collections+and+Archives%3A+Wally+Rosenthal
Duration:
01:31:25
No index available for this file.
No transcript available for this file.